How to Build up a Tight yet Expansive Network

Before you can play, you need to know what the game is, and who the players are. More importantly, you need to ask yourself why you want to embark on this adventure. Building an audience on Social Media is not a numbers game. I have seen people buy followers, try to steal friends, and awkwardly insert themselves into conversations without asking what, who or why.

Tight

Don’t join the party if you don’t understand the topics that will be discussed. Show respect for the members of the club by doing your research. Influencers may be nice, but they are busy, so don’t waste their time. Know before you go.

Find the clusters of credibility. These are the handful of people who are at the center of every conversation.

For example:
#DataScience = @KirkDBorne
#AnimalRights = @LeoAnselmi
#Politics = @jk_rowling (Yes, that J.K. Rowling. If you don’t understand why, check her tweets and read “Harry Potter”)

Expansive

This is tricky, but it’s never too late. You can only truly get a taste of the global conversations around a topic if you are multilingual. This is how I started my Twitter adventure. I didn’t just follow librarians, I also followed bibliotecarios, bibliotecari, Bibliothekare; etc.

Technology allows you to make friends around the world. Understanding words leads to understanding ideas, history, and passion, all of which will make you a better writer and conversationalist. So, either stay in school, or renew your commitment to lifelong education. Learn a new language. I’m currently working on my German.

Baseball-Softball-Singapore-Team-Batter-Flying-Ball-Super-Friendly-Action-Sports

Amusing

Once you’ve found the right people, and mastered the topics of interest, add your personal touch. There are plenty of bots and lists. What makes you different? Why should people subscribe to your content?

Here’s a secret: Inside jokes go a long way. Be brief, be funny, and never ever automate your tweets. Why? Because comedy is all about timing. You can’t be funny if you’re not there to seize the moment, and enjoy the laughter. As in “real life”, you have to be present and alert if you want people to remember you.

Meaningful

Being a bystander won’t bring you any satisfaction. Once you’ve found the right people, topics, and style, join the party.

Don’t wait for people to come to you, go to them and introduce yourself.
“Hello, I’m (your name here). This is why you’re awesome, and this is why I’m awesome.”

Making friends online works the same as making friends offline. You have to take risks.

Special

You don’t have to share all of you, but however much of you gets posted has to be real. This is where you can have fun with pictures, video, and personal stories. Show what only you have access to. Bring your audience into your celebrations. If you make every member of your audience feel special, you have built a tight network, even as it continues to expand.

Interesting Read

If you don’t know it yet you should check out the book ‘Working Out Loud‘ by John Stepper which is now available as announced last year on our article here.

Photo credit: NRK P3Stanley Yeo

Silvia Spiva

Silvia Spiva

Silvia K. Spiva is a Multicultural Marketer, creating content for global audiences, from the heart of Silicon Valley. Her passions include children's literacy, STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math), and finding ways to bridge if not crush the #DigitalDivide.
Silvia Spiva

@silviakspiva

Community Manager at Cisco DevNet. MY tweets!
Silvia Spiva
Silvia Spiva

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Silvia Spiva

Silvia K. Spiva is a Multicultural Marketer, creating content for global audiences, from the heart of Silicon Valley. Her passions include children's literacy, STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math), and finding ways to bridge if not crush the #DigitalDivide.

3 thoughts on “How to Build up a Tight yet Expansive Network

  • October 2, 2015 at 10:50 pm
    Permalink

    What a fabulous write-up and to read a reference to John Stepper at the end is like the cherry on top! This is really one of the most human, admirable, warmest posts I’ve ever read on this topic. I love it!

    Reply
  • October 2, 2015 at 10:50 pm
    Permalink

    What a fabulous write-up and to read a reference to John Stepper at the end is like the cherry on top! This is really one of the most human, admirable, warmest posts I’ve ever read on this topic. I love it!

    Reply
    • November 8, 2015 at 3:02 am
      Permalink

      Thanks again for your encouraging words, Marshall. It means a lot to me that you took the time to read and share my article.

      Reply

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